FREE the MASON



Brn, do you know why this is significant?

Brn, do you know why this is significant?




Just how universal is the lessons of Freemasonry? In 281 BC China, Mencius, a follower of Confucius wrote: “The Master mason in teaching his apprentices, makes use of the Square and the Compasses. Ye who are engaged in the pursuit of wisdom must also make use of the Square and the Compasses.”


WE MEET UPON THE LEVEL, AND WE PART UPON THE SQUARE,—What words of precious meaning those words Masonic are!Come, let us contemplate them; they are worthy of a thought,—With the highest and the lowest and the rarest they are fraught.
We meet upon the Level, though from every station come —The King from out his palace and the poor man from his home;For the one must leave his diadem without the Mason’s door,And the other finds his true respect upon the checkered floor.
We part upon the square, for the world must have its due;We mingle with its multitude, a cold, unfriendly crew;But the influence of our gatherings in memory is green,And we long, upon the level, to renew the happy scene.
There’s a World where all are equal,—we are hurrying towards it fast,—We shall meet upon the level there when the gates of death are past;We shall stand before the Orient, and our Master will be there,To try the blocks we offer by His own unerring Square.
We shall meet upon the level there, but never thence depart;There’s a Mansion,— ‘tis all ready for each zealous, faithful heart;There’s a Mansion, and a welcome, and a multitude is there,Who have met upon the level and been tried upon the square.
Let us meet upon the level, then, while laboring patient here,—Let us meet and let us labor, tho’ the labor seem severe;Already in the western sky the signs bid us prepareTo gather up our working tools and part upon the square.
Hands round, ye faithful Ghibilimites, the bright, fraternal chain;We part upon the square below, to meet in Heaven again!O what words of precious meaning those words Masonic are,WE MEET UPON THE LEVEL, AND WE PART UPON THE SQUARE.
~ Dr. Rob Morris, LLD, Masonic Poet Laureate 1818-1888

WE MEET UPON THE LEVEL, AND WE PART UPON THE SQUARE,—
What words of precious meaning those words Masonic are!
Come, let us contemplate them; they are worthy of a thought,—
With the highest and the lowest and the rarest they are fraught.

We meet upon the Level, though from every station come —
The King from out his palace and the poor man from his home;
For the one must leave his diadem without the Mason’s door,
And the other finds his true respect upon the checkered floor.

We part upon the square, for the world must have its due;
We mingle with its multitude, a cold, unfriendly crew;
But the influence of our gatherings in memory is green,
And we long, upon the level, to renew the happy scene.

There’s a World where all are equal,—we are hurrying towards it fast,—
We shall meet upon the level there when the gates of death are past;
We shall stand before the Orient, and our Master will be there,
To try the blocks we offer by His own unerring Square.

We shall meet upon the level there, but never thence depart;
There’s a Mansion,— ‘tis all ready for each zealous, faithful heart;
There’s a Mansion, and a welcome, and a multitude is there,
Who have met upon the level and been tried upon the square.

Let us meet upon the level, then, while laboring patient here,—
Let us meet and let us labor, tho’ the labor seem severe;
Already in the western sky the signs bid us prepare
To gather up our working tools and part upon the square.

Hands round, ye faithful Ghibilimites, the bright, fraternal chain;
We part upon the square below, to meet in Heaven again!
O what words of precious meaning those words Masonic are,
WE MEET UPON THE LEVEL, AND WE PART UPON THE SQUARE.

Dr. Rob Morris, LLD, Masonic Poet Laureate 1818-1888



I met a dear old man today
Who wore a Masonic pin.
It was old and faded like the man
Its edges were worn quite thin
 
I approached the park bench where he sat
To give the old brother his due
I said, “I see you’ve traveled east.”
He said, “I have, have you?”
 
I said, “I have and in my day
Before the all seeing sun
I played in the rubble of Jubala
Jubilo, and Jubalum.”
 
He shouted, “Don’t laugh at the work my son.
It’s good and sweet and true.
And if you’ve traveled as you have said
You should give these things a due.
 
"The word, the sign, the token,
The sweet Masonic prayer,
The vow that all have taken
Who have climbed the inner stair.
 
"The wages of a Mason
are never paid in gold.
But the gain comes from contentment
when you’re weak and growing old.
 
"You see I’ve carried my obligation
for almost fifty years.
It has helped me through the hardships
and the failures full of tears.
 
"Now I’m losing my mind and my body.
Death is near but I don’t despair.
I’ve lived my life upon the level
And I’m dying upon the square.”
 
Sometimes the greatest lessons
Are those that are learned anew
And the old man in the park today
has changed my point of view.
 
To all Masonic Brothers
The only secret is to care.
May you live upon the level.
May you part upon the square.
I met a dear old man today
Who wore a Masonic pin.
It was old and faded like the man
Its edges were worn quite thin
 
I approached the park bench where he sat
To give the old brother his due
I said, “I see you’ve traveled east.”
He said, “I have, have you?”
 
I said, “I have and in my day
Before the all seeing sun
I played in the rubble of Jubala
Jubilo, and Jubalum.”
 
He shouted, “Don’t laugh at the work my son.
It’s good and sweet and true.
And if you’ve traveled as you have said
You should give these things a due.
 
"The word, the sign, the token,
The sweet Masonic prayer,
The vow that all have taken
Who have climbed the inner stair.
 
"The wages of a Mason
are never paid in gold.
But the gain comes from contentment
when you’re weak and growing old.
 
"You see I’ve carried my obligation
for almost fifty years.
It has helped me through the hardships
and the failures full of tears.
 
"Now I’m losing my mind and my body.
Death is near but I don’t despair.
I’ve lived my life upon the level
And I’m dying upon the square.”
 
Sometimes the greatest lessons
Are those that are learned anew
And the old man in the park today
has changed my point of view.
 
To all Masonic Brothers
The only secret is to care.
May you live upon the level.
May you part upon the square.